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Enough is Enough is Enough

Updated: Jul 1, 2023




It’s mad that a protest involving two people can get more attention than one involving ten thousand. All it takes is two cans of tomato soup thrown at a Van Gogh … or the guts to mount the roof of a Tube train during rush hour. But I'm glad I joined the crowds at King's Cross on 1st October, protesting our need for a competent government to handle the cost of living crisis, shouting our rage: ‘enough is enough.’


The ‘Enough is Enough’ rally was organised by trade unionist Mick Lynch, who said, 'In the leadership campaign, if that's what you can call it, we had a choice between two short straws for the working class in this country. They want to change this society so that the rich man's on top and the workers are down below.' Lynch’s words amplified our thoughts: we did not vote for Liz Truss and we did not ask for her. We did not choose Rishi Sunak in any kind of a democratic process. The Conservatives cannot simply keep switching out their Queen bee for a fresher, more right-wing face. We need a general election, so the conversations can be about policy and not popularity.


Lynch’s words amplified our thoughts: we did not vote for Liz Truss and we did not ask for her. We did not choose Rishi Sunak in any kind of a democratic process.

Looking around, I saw XR flags, 'I have Truss Issues' signs, 'Tax the Rich' banners, and placards supporting the trade unions, the Don't Pay campaign and the Labour party. Of course, Keir Starmer wasn't present at an event which supported the strikers, having forbidden his shadow ministers from standing on picket lines. It was incredible to be amongst so many different organisations, individuals and groups, all protesting for a fairer Britain. My own placard simply read, 'It's not fair.'


From feeling worried and angry--about tax cuts for the highest earners in Kwasi Kwarteng's ephemeral mini-budget, soaring profits for energy's big bosses and the inflated price of my favourite breakfast muffins at Sainsbury's--I felt a surge of hope. My anger still remains. But at this rally, I felt my anger might have an effect, joining with the pink flares around me and the fists in the air to make some kind of impression on those who decide the policies that determine our lives.


From feeling worried and angry--about tax cuts for the highest earners in Kwasi Kwarteng's ephemeral mini-budget, soaring profits for energy's big bosses and the inflated price of my favourite breakfast muffins at Sainsbury's--I felt a surge of hope.

Two months on, I’m struggling to remain hopeful. We are approaching a Christmas of strikes, because our rail workers, postal service and NHS do not have what they need. Only the highest earners have what they need this December. They have what they need to heat their mansions and fill up the tanks of their Mercedes Benzes and to cram the spaces beneath their Christmas trees with elegantly wrapped luxuries.


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